Friday, 15 August 2014 09:51

UK Biomass Calculator A Useful and Valuable Tool for the U.S. Industrial Wood Pellet Industry

2014-08-15 095226 usipaThe U.S. Industrial Pellet Association (USIPA) welcomes the release of the UK’s Bioenergy and Counterfactuals Model (BEaC) as an instrument for calculating biomass emissions. This calculator can play an important role in demonstrating that biomass from the U.S. produced from sawmill residues, thinnings, and other low-value fiber can significantly reduce greenhouse gas and carbon emissions and will remain a valuable energy resource in mitigating climate change.

“We look forward to working with the UK to continue to deliver this affordable, low-carbon energy source that is keeping the lights on while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions.”

The UK’s biomass emissions calculator is just one tool in the UK’s arsenal to promote the sustainability and carbon benefits of using biomass in place of coal. Combined with some of the most stringent biomass sustainability requirements in the world, the UK can ensure that the biomass it imports is sustainable and that new and existing projects can create the proper supply chains to produce this low-carbon renewable energy source.

Speaking about the calculator, USIPA Executive Director Seth Ginther said, “We are pleased to see the UK take the initiative to create a tool that will verify that responsibly sourced biomass is sustainable and carbon beneficial. This calculator, along with the UK’s strong sustainability requirements for biomass, can help policy makers with understanding the industry, and assist producers with ensuring their product is sustainable.

"However, it should be noted that the calculator does not consider the economic, regulatory, and social conditions that also promote sustainable forest management in the U.S. The UK government should use the BEaC calculator in conjunction with these aspects of the industry to determine the full carbon benefits that the biomass life-cycle can bring.

"We look forward to working with the UK to continue to deliver this affordable, low-carbon energy source that is keeping the lights on while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions.”

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