Monday, 08 July 2013 09:30

Alternate energy heats up in Enderby

Enderby is taking strides to become one of the most energy-efficient communities in B.C.

fink bio fbr

Burkhard Fink, with Fink Machine, points out the highlights of Enderby’s bio-energy system to Rhona Martin, with the Union of B.C. Municipalities, Friday.

On Friday, the city unveiled its bio-energy system which uses waste wood to heat the public works shop, parts of the sewage treatment plant and the kennel.

“We’re in a leadership position in terms of sustainability,” said Mayor Howie Cyr.

The next step is to possibly expand the plant to include the arena, curling rink, A.L. Fortune Secondary School and industrial businesses near McGowan Street, where the bio-energy system is located.

“Ideally, we would like to see the system throughout the downtown area,” said Cyr.

“There is also a potential opportunity for the Splatsin First Nation to tap in.”

The city’s plant uses technology from Enderby-based Fink Machine, which has its own system providing heat to the community’s outdoor pool.

Burkhard Fink, owner of Fink Machine, is trying to convince the Interior Health Authority to allow bio-energy to heat the Parkview Place seniors residence.

“There is certainly potential here,” said Fink.

The city’s bio-energy system is expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 250 tonnes a year and its operating costs by more than $85,000 annually.

The total cost of the project was $296,700, with the majority coming from the federal gas tax fund.

“This is just a great investment,” said Colin Mayes, Okanagan-Shuswap MP.

Other partners were the provincial government and the Union of B.C. Municipalities.

Local mills will continue to be a source of wood waste for the bio-energy plant and the city is also considering planting trees as a renewable source.

“There will also be a drop-off for citizens when they do  their pruning,” said Cyr.

source: vernonmorningstar.com

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